Accessibility
Appointments and information:
Appointments and information:

Breast health office (mammologist)

Women and men of all ages who want to check their breasts or who have questions or complaints related to their breasts are welcome to make an appointment at the Breast Health Office. You can also get help and instructions for independent breast examination.

A referral is not necessary to make an appointment with a gynaecologist or a midwife at the Breast Health Office. You can come for an appointment even if you have no specific complaints, but be sure to come if you feel any lumps, knots, bumps or other changes in your breasts. For breast problems requiring urgent intervention (e.g. suspected cancer), mammography can be performed on the same day as the appointment.

Booking an appointment: 

Frequently asked questions

Here, you can find answers to the questions most frequently asked. If you are unable to find the answer to your question, feel free to email us at rind [at] itk.ee.

How to check your breasts?

Look at your breasts in the mirror first with your hands next to your body and then with your hands behind your head:

  • are your breasts regular in size and shape?

  • is the skin smooth and uniform, with a normal colour?

  • do the nipples seem normal and move up as you raise your hand?

It is easiest to feel your breasts when bathing when the skin is soapy. This makes any unevenness and potential lumps easy to detect under slippery fingers.

  • Use the straightened fingers of your right hand to examine your left breast, pressing it softly.

  • Start with the nipple, moving outwards with light circular motions.

  • Use the same method to feel the entire breast and the area under the arm.

  • Then do the same to the right breast using your left hand.

It is essential that you come for an examination if you notice:

  • a painless 'lump', thickened tissue in the breast or under the arm;

  • changes in the shape, size or skin colour of the breast;

  • discharge from nipples;

  • retraction of the nipple or skin;

  • pain or discomfort in one breast;

  • redness of the breast, orange peel skin, ulcers; or

  • enlarged lymph nodes under the arm.

Why should you take part in breast cancer screening?

Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumour among Estonian women. Every year, more than 900 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in Estonia and in nearly 25% of cases the disease is already advanced by the time of discovery. Early discovery of the disease improves treatment outcomes, which is why it is important to get screened for breast cancer between the ages of 50 and 69. You can choose the day and place that suits you best for screening. You do not need an invitation to come for screening. Breast cancer discovered early on can be cured!

How to book an appointment?

Which East Tallinn Central Hospital units perform mammography and where are Breast Health Offices located?

Mammography examinations take place in the Magdaleena Unit at Pärnu mnt 104; Breast Health Office appointments can be booked at the Magdaleena Unit  at Pärnu mnt 104 and the Tõnismäe Unit at Hariduse 6.

Can men also come for an appointment at the Breast Health Office?

Men can also come for an appointment at the breast health office because they can also have problems and questions regarding their breasts.

I discovered a lump in my breast – do I have breast cancer?

Discovering a lump in the breast or seeing changes in the shape and appearance of the breast can cause anxiety. However, you should stay calm because these changes may be benign. Though we still recommend coming for a check-up! If cancer is suspected on the basis of your complaints and initial examinations, we can quickly refer you for further tests and to the necessary specialists. This way, we can give you back your peace of mind faster or start with the necessary treatment as soon as possible.

Breast pain and discomfort – could this be a sign of breast cancer?

Breast soreness can also be caused by the menstrual cycle, muscle tension, excessive exercise or other factors. If you feel soreness, it is best to give your body a break. If the pain and discomfort persist for a longer period (weeks), then be sure to contact the Breast Health Office or make an appointment.

What happens if I am diagnosed with breast cancer?

Not all changes in breast health mean that you have cancer. If cancer is suspected on the basis of your complaints and initial examinations, we can quickly refer you for further tests and to the necessary specialists. Our hospital has separate appointment and examination times for patients with suspected cancer so as to be able to confirm or refute potential cancer diagnosis. If cancer is suspected, specialists will specify the presence, size and location of the tumour. Most examinations are carried out on an outpatient basis, meaning that there is no need for a long stay (overnight stay) in hospital. Sometimes, surgery for retrieving a tissue sample is needed for an accurate diagnosis. These procedures are usually done on a day-care basis, i.e. patients can go home after the examination. The time it takes to get back results depends on the type of examination. With radiological examinations, responses usually arrive in up to three days, while for histological tissue analyses you can expect a response within two weeks. Answers to more complex analyses can take up to one month. For more information on cancer treatment and breast cancer, visit the cancer treatment page of East Tallinn Central Hospital

Doctors

Anu Suurpalu
Anu Suurpalu
Gynaecologist
Women's Clinic
Gabor Szirko
Gabor Szirko
Mammologist - Chief Physician
Women's Clinic, Centre of Gynaecology

Midwives

Helle Pihel
Helle Pihel
Midwife
Women's Clinic, Sünnitusmaja-perinataalkeskus
Mariliis Kippar
Midwife
Women's Clinic, Sünnitusmaja-perinataalkeskus
Annika Hommik
Annika Hommik
Midwife
Women's Clinic, Sünnitusmaja-perinataalkeskus
Agnes Selin
Agnes Selin
Midwife
Women's Clinic, Sünnitusmaja-perinataalkeskus